Curriculum

C-360_LogoColorStudy2About Community360’s Framework for

Leadership Training

  • Community360 explores Awareness >> It’s about the ability to see what others miss and to appreciate what others take for granted. It’s about recognizing the difference between the world as it is and the world as we would have it be.

  • Community360 explores Acknowledgment >> It’s about looking in the mirror as leaders and asking ourselves how we can make our communities the way we want them to be. It’s about getting present to the moments when our choices have the power to create — or destroy — the results we intend.

  • Community360 explores Action >> It’s about learning the skills necessary to be the difference we want to see in the world. It’s about people finding connection and through it, co-creating communities that work for all of us. Connection skills we teach include mediation, restorative justice and community organizing.IMG_2234

About Community360’s Connection Skills

  • Community Organizing (creating empowerment) Community Organizing is the process of a peer organizer connecting community members around shared needs, developing strategies to meet those shared needs, and then connecting to others outside of the community until the strategy is implemented or the shared needs are met. For those connected to it, this process produces the experience of power ̶ being able to meet needs. Community Organizing is distinct from advocacy or activism in that advocacy implies a non-community member speaking for community members and activism implies action but doesn’t imply collective strategy ̶ neither scenario of which would be appropriate within the context of community organizing. Community organizing is most appropriate when there are community-wide needs that transcend the specific needs of a few individuals and for situations where the resources to address the needs are controlled by non-community members.IMG_2226

  • Peer Mediation (creating peace) Peer Mediation is the process of a peer mediator connecting conflictants through empathic dialogue, connecting conflictants around their respective needs and then, in the space of connection, making compassionate requests of each other. For those connected to it, this process produces the experience of peace ̶ being needs-fulfilled in the moment. Peer Mediation is distinct from conflict resolution or conflict management in that resolution implies that conflict is unnatural or in need of ending and management implies that some measure of external control must be applied to conflictants ̶ neither scenario of which would be appropriate within the context of peer mediation. Peer mediation is most appropriate when there are individual needs that appear to be in conflict but where those needs do not rise to the level of community-wide needs and where both conflictants choose to participate in mediation.  IMG_2361

  • Restorative Justice (creating restoration) Restorative Justice is the process of a team of peer justices connecting the victim and offender through empathic dialogue, connecting them around their respective and shared needs and then, in the space of connection, developing strategies to meet both individual and shared needs. Once strategies are developed, the victim, offender and peer justices implement the strategies until harm is repaired. For those connected to it, this process produces the experience of restoration ̶ both self and community returned to being needs-fulfilled. Restorative Justice is distinct from the dominant view of justice (ie: retributive justice/criminal justice) in that retributive justice implies that the focus should be on blame and punishment ̶ neither scenario of which would be appropriate within the context of restorative justice. Restorative Justice is most appropriate when individual needs have been interrupted at the same time that the community’s shared needs have been interrupted and where both the victim and offender choose to participate in restoration.

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